quote

"

In short [Claudius] is very human. Now these are the very qualities Hamlet lacks. Hamlet is inhuman. He has seen through humanity. And this inhuman cynicism, however justifiable on the plane of causality and individual responsibility, is a deadly and venomous thing. Instinctively the creatures of earth, Laertes, Polonius, Ophelia, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, league themselves with Claudius: they are of his kind. They sever themselves from Hamlet. Laertes sternly warns Ophelia against her intimacy with Hamlet, so does Polonius. They are, in fact, all leagued against him, they are puzzled by him or fear him: he has no friend except Horatio, and Horatio, after the ghost scenes, becomes a queer shadowy character who rarely gets beyond ‘E’en so, my lord’, ‘My lord—’, and such-like phrases. The other persons are firmly drawn, in the round, creatures of flesh and blood. But Hamlet is not of flesh and blood, he is a spirit of penetrating intellect and cynicism and misery, without faith in himself or anyone else, murdering his love of Ophelia, on the brink of insanity, taking delight in cruelty, torturing Claudius, wringing his mother’s heart, a poison in the midst of the healthy bustle of the court. He is a superman among men. And he is a superman because he has walked and held converse with death, and his consciousness works in terms of death and negation of cynicism. He has seen the truth, not alone of Denmark, but of humanity, of the universe: and the truth is evil. Thus Hamlet is an element of evil in the state of Denmark. The poison of his mental existence spreads outwards among things of flesh and blood, like acid eating into metal. They are helpless before his very inactivity and fall one after the other, like victims of an infectious disease. They are strong with the strength of health—but the demon of Hamlet’s mind is a stronger thing than they. Futilely they try to get him out of their country; anything to get rid of him, he is not safe. But he goes with a cynical smile, and is no sooner gone than he is back again in their midst, meditating in graveyards, at home with death. Not till he has slain all, is the demon that grips Hamlet satisfied. And last it slays Hamlet himself:

The spirit that I have seen
May be the Devil…
(II. ii. 635)


It was.

It was the devil of the knowledge of death, which possesses Hamlet and drives him from misery and pain to increasing bitterness, cynicism, murder, and madness. He has indeed bought converse with his father’s spirit at the price of enduring and spreading Hell on earth. But however much we may sympathize with Ophelia, with Polonius, Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, the Queen, and Claudius, there is one reservation to be made. It is Hamlet who is right."
G. Wilson Knight, “The Embassy of Death: An Essay on Hamlet" (from The Wheel of Fire)

(Source: grandhotelabyss, via fuckyeahhamlet)

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thought-cafe:

Crash Course Literature #4: Hamlet II. http://youtu.be/nDCohlKUufs

(via fuckyeahhamlet)

imperiatrix:

one thing that really frustrates me about every production of hamlet that i’ve seen is that they seem to be casting hamlet for richard burbage and not for, you know, hamlet. he’s not a charismatic leading man playing the role of a lifetime. he’s a depressed college student. casting him as a 30 year old man who still isn’t king for some reason makes him look like a indolent manchild, and there’s a reason for that

he’s a fucking child

(via fuckyeahhamlet)

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littlepennydreadful:

Maude Fealy, c. 1905

As Ophelia, looks like.

littlepennydreadful:

Maude Fealy, c. 1905

As Ophelia, looks like.

(Source: charles-hardin-holley, via londoninquisitor)

quote

"What he intimates is larger and more lasting than his momentary self-disgust. If you can unpack your heart with words, then what you express is already dead within you. With no faith left in either language or the self, and no transcendental allegiances, Hamlet nevertheless retains a conviction in the truth-inducings of theater."
Harold Bloom, from Hamlet: Poem Unlimited  (via fuckyeahhamlet)

(Source: secretinterference, via fuckyeahhamlet)

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fuckyeahgreatplays:


RSC Artistic Director Gregory Doran says Henry IV Parts I and II are two of Shakespeare’s greatest plays. We wondered if our audience would agree.
We asked people to vote in a poll on this page for Shakespeare’s greatest play (#shakespearesgreatest) from a list of all of his plays. The poll took place in the first week of January. 2222 people voted. 
And the winner is …
Hamlet was the overwhelming winner with 431 votes, followed by King Lear with 307 votes. Henry VIII, The Merry Wives of Windsor and Timon of Athens only had one vote each.

I’m surprised R&J didn’t break the top 10. Not because of quality but at least because of popularity. And JC is #18!
Full breakdown here.

fuckyeahgreatplays:

RSC Artistic Director Gregory Doran says Henry IV Parts I and II are two of Shakespeare’s greatest plays. We wondered if our audience would agree.

We asked people to vote in a poll on this page for Shakespeare’s greatest play (#shakespearesgreatest) from a list of all of his plays. The poll took place in the first week of January. 2222 people voted. 

And the winner is …

Hamlet was the overwhelming winner with 431 votes, followed by King Lear with 307 votes. Henry VIII, The Merry Wives of Windsor and Timon of Athens only had one vote each.

I’m surprised R&J didn’t break the top 10. Not because of quality but at least because of popularity. And JC is #18!

Full breakdown here.

(via fuckyeahhamlet)

teamfivey:

doing a very important survey in the hamlet fandom

reblog this post if you prefer dark-haired hamlet

(here's for light haired)

Dark haired Hamlet ftw!

(via fuckyeahhamlet)

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inklingsandpencildrawings:

Rereading “Hamlet” for the umpteenth time, this time for AP Lit. Actually, it’s legitimately my favorite Shakespeare play; I memorized Hamlet’s entire third soliloquy the summer after eighth grade because, you know, I’m me. AND IT IS JUST WORDED SO GORGEOUSLY.
But, of course, everyone dies by the end. Kudos, William. Kudos.

I… think I also memorized the third soliloquy when I was around that age. Shakespeare twins.

inklingsandpencildrawings:

Rereading “Hamlet” for the umpteenth time, this time for AP Lit. Actually, it’s legitimately my favorite Shakespeare play; I memorized Hamlet’s entire third soliloquy the summer after eighth grade because, you know, I’m me. AND IT IS JUST WORDED SO GORGEOUSLY.

But, of course, everyone dies by the end. Kudos, William. Kudos.

I… think I also memorized the third soliloquy when I was around that age. Shakespeare twins.

(via fuckyeahhamlet)

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talesofadeatheater:

Being an English major means getting awesome emails with Hamlet flowcharts from your professors. :’)

talesofadeatheater:

Being an English major means getting awesome emails with Hamlet flowcharts from your professors. :’)

(via fuckyeahhamlet)

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Based on this post (x)

It’s got a graphic!

Based on this post (x)

It’s got a graphic!

(Source: srelectrico, via fuckyeahhamlet)